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Dental Fillings for Your Child
Portland, OR


Kid with a Great Grin thanks to Dental Fillings - Pediatric Dentist Portland, OR

Composite Fillings


What are they?


Composite fillings are a mixture of glass or quartz filler in a plastic resin that produces a tooth-colored filling. They are sometimes referred to as composites or filled resins.

What limitations are there?


Composites might stain or discolor over time. Composite fillings are more difficult to place because they require a cavity that must be kept clean and dry during filling and so it generally takes longer to place a composite filling than an amalgam filling. The cost is moderate; more than a silver filling but much less than porcelain crowns or inlays.

What is good about them?


Composites can be "bonded" or adhesively held in a cavity, often allowing the dentist to make a more conservative repair to the tooth. Because the dentist removes less tooth structure when preparing the tooth, this results in a smaller filling than that of an amalgam.

Summary:


Composite fillings cost a little more because they mimic natural tooth color and the natural translucency of enamel, they provide excellent appearance, and they have good durability and resistance to fracture in small-to-mid size restorations in patients with normal chewing pressure.

Ionomers


What are they?


Resin Ionomers and Glass Ionomers are translucent, tooth-colored materials made of a mixture of acrylic acids and fine glass powders that are used to fill cavities, particularly those on the root surfaces of teeth.

What is good about them?


Ionomers release a small amount of fluoride that may be beneficial for patients who are at high risk for decay. Because the dentist removes less tooth structure when preparing the tooth, this results in a smaller filling than for an amalgam.

What limitations are there?


1.  Glass ionomers release more fluoride and tolerate moisture better than resin ionomers. Because they can fracture, glass ionomers are mostly used in small fillings in areas not subject to heavy chewing pressure or on the roots of teeth.
2.  Resin ionomers release less fluoride and are not as tolerant of wet conditions as glass ionomers. They also are used for small fillings and on the root surfaces of teeth: they have a better resistance to fracture but wear down.

Summary:


Ionomers work better than composites in wet areas but experience high wear OR fracture if large fillings are placed on chewing surfaces. Both glass and resin ionomers mimic natural tooth color but lack the natural translucency of enamel or composite

Amalgam Fillings


What are they?


Dental amalgam is a stable alloy made by combining elemental mercury, silver, tin, copper and other metallic elements. Although dental amalgam continues to be a safe, commonly used restorative material, its mercury content has raised some concern. However, the mercury in amalgam combines with other metals to render it stable and safe for use in filling teeth.

What is good about them?


Because amalgam fillings can withstand very high chewing loads, they are particularly useful for restoring molars in the back of the mouth where chewing load is greatest. They are also useful in areas where a cavity preparation is difficult to keep dry during the filling replacement, such as in deep fillings below the gum line. It remains a valued treatment option because it is durable, easy to use, highly resistant to wear and relatively inexpensive in comparison to other materials.

What limitations are there?


Disadvantages of amalgam include sensitivity to chewing metal foil and possible short-term sensitivity to hot or cold after placing the filling. The silver-colored filling is not as natural looking as one that is tooth-colored, especially when the restoration is near the front of the mouth, and shows when the patient laughs or speaks. Moreover, to prepare the tooth, the dentist may need to remove more tooth structure to accommodate an amalgam filling than for other types of fillings. Long term, there is a higher chance of breaking cusps off teeth if the amalgam fillings swell up.

Summary:


It has a long history of use and it wears well. It can be placed in wet areas better than composite and it is cheaper because it is easier to place. However, amalgam is dark colored, it can fracture teeth after many years, and can be sensitive to temperature and chewing metal foil, and usually more tooth must be cut away to place it.

If you have any questions, or if you'd like to schedule an appointment, please give us a call at (971) 470-0054.
Learn more about Invisalign® for your teen Learn more about traditional orthodontics at Great Grins for KIDS - Portland Learn more about the friendly children's dentistry at Great Grins for KIDS - Portland

Check Out Great Grins for KIDS!
•  Specializing in dentistry for infants, children, adolescents and special needs patients
•  Affordable payment plans available
•  Accepting new patients
•  Quality care
•  Experienced staff
•  Fun atmosphere
•  Cavity Free Club
•  Sedation Dentistry
•  Comprehensive Orthodontics
•  High-Tech Laser
•  Accepts most insurance

(971) 470-0054
13908 SE Stark Street Suite C Portland, OR 97233-2161

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Great Grins for KIDS Portland, 13908 SE Stark Street, Portland, OR, 97233-2161 - Tags: fillings Portland OR \ Childrens dentist in Portland OR \ pediatric dentist Portland OR \ (971) 470-0054 \ www.portlandchildrensdentist.com \ 11/24/2017